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Jean-Jacques-Régis de Cambacérès, duke of Parme

Jean-Jacques-Régis de Cambacérès, duc de Parme (18 October 1753 – 8 March 1824), was a French nobleman, lawyer and statesman during the French Revolution and the First Empire

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Jean-Jacques-Régis de Cambacérès, duke de Parme, (born Oct. 18, 1753, Montpellier, France—died March 8, 1824, Paris), French statesman and legal expert who was second consul with Napoleon Bonaparte and then archchancellor of the empire. As Napoleon’s principal adviser on all juridical matters from 1800 to 1814, he was instrumental in formulating the Napoleonic Code, or Civil Code (1804), and subsequent codes. Often consulted on other matters of state, he tried to exert a moderating influence on the emperor.

Member of a family long associated with the law, Cambacérès became counselor in the Court of Aids at Montpellier in 1774 and president of the criminal court there in 1791. Elected to the Convention in 1792, he voted at the trial of Louis XVI for the sentence of death to take effect only if France were invaded. He kept clear of party quarrels and concerned himself mainly with judicial and legislative matters. The two successive drafts for a civil code that he and Philippe-Antoine Merlin produced were not enacted. After November 1794 he became a member of the Committee of Public Safety and occupied himself with foreign affairs, being instrumental in concluding the peace treaties of 1795 with Tuscany, Prussia, the Dutch, and Spain. When the Convention was dissolved he became a member of the Council of Five Hundred. Because he was not reelected in May 1797, he turned to his private law practice. Then in July 1799 he was appointed minister of justice.

Having discreetly assisted Bonaparte and Emmanuel Sieyès to organize the coup d’état of 18 Brumaire, year VIII (Nov. 9, 1799), that overthrew the Directory, Cambacérès became second consul the following December. In 1802 he rendered substantial help in establishing the life consulate for Bonaparte. He was made archchancellor of the empire in 1804 and was created Duke of Parma in 1808. Presiding over the Senate and, as a rule, over the Council of State, he exercised extended powers during Napoleon’s absences.

Excluded from public life at the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy (1814), Cambacérès reluctantly returned to it in the Hundred Days, at Napoleon’s bidding, when he directed the Ministry of Justice and presided over the Chamber of Peers. Exiled at the Second Restoration, he lived in Belgium until 1818, when he was allowed to return to France.

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